La Rochelle

La Rochelle was always going to be a highlight – and it didn’t disappoint.DSC_0489 DSC_0485 DSC_0469

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But we had to get there first.

We pulled away from our home of the last week, on a cold, dark morning. We made our way out to sea, together in convoy with Ooroo, and into a brisk 30kt SW. It was a bumpy ride down the coast, with the two girls buried under rugs and donnas, trying to keep the seasickness at bay.

Meanwhile, Allan and I were busy putting in reefs and trying to learn all the systems and electronics. La Mischief was treating the rough weather as a walk in the park, much better than her crew.

We finally managed to round the top of Ile De Re and the seas started to calm a little. The girls at this stage had retired to their respective cabins and we had to wake them as we approached La Rochelle.

Brendan was on board Ooroo so he was able to direct us into the Port des Minimes marina, which is at the mouth of the entrance. Here we waited for a couple of hours until the tide came in and we were able to progress into the centre of La Rochelle.

What an amazing entrance as we passed by the twin forts that guard the entrance to the old port. We were heading next door to the ‘bassin à flot’ behind a set of lock gates that open 2 hours either side of high tide.

The port captain directed us to a pontoon, with very little manoeuvring space either side. We carefully crept past a row of boats with some nasty looking anchors poking out at us. Ooroo went in first and successfully tied up, with us slipping in behind them. Thank goodness I was now getting used to driving and parking La Mischief, which is considerably bigger and heavier than Camelot (but now I’m used to it, its a lot easier to manoeuvre).

We were now tied up in one of the most beautiful port settings in the world, surrounded by stunning old buildings.

At this point Brendan said his goodbyes and we were now on our own. Two Aussie boat crews that knew about 20 French words between them. All the VHF radio traffic is in French. Every now and then we would hear a “Securite” call on the radio and we would not know what they were saying – maybe it was something like “beware of dumb Australian yachties in the area”.

Once checked in and marina fees paid, it was time to explore. We wandered around to the old port and into the old city behind. It was full of narrow streets with elegant shops, coffee bars and a traditional market.

We could only book in for a single night because there was a boat show happening later on so we had to the next high tide when we would need to leave. We had a wonderful morning wandering around the shops, stopping for lunch and coffees. Cas and I managed to each buy hats as well as a few other bits and pieces.

Back at La Mischief, it was time to leave and as there was no space to swing around, we needed to back out past 6 or 7 boats, with their anchors threatening to punish any mistakes. We made it out okay but Ooroo, being a bit wider picked up a scratch on its new fibreglass.

Back to the marina at the Port des Minimes we went and paid for a berth. It turned out that the berths we paid for were on a set of visitors jetties that were full. This marina has 3,500 berths and is known for this sort of thing – the staff are pretty useless – so in the end we just found our own spots. In the meantime, we watched a power boat take out a 240v power cabinet and knock it off its footing and into the water. They courageously (or stupidly) picked it out of the water with a boathook.

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Similar to the Russians we saw in Sables D’Olonne, who were there to pick up a Lagoon 450 and decided to start drinking at 10am for a few hours before leaving for the Med and taking out the corner of the floating pontoon on the way out.

Anyway back to La Rochelle, where we had a good nights sleep before leaving for Ile D’Aix the next day.

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